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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
is months overdue. i hope mrs. clinton backs up her promise and "i take full responsibility for benghazi." i hope you do, madam secretary. i hope you don't let the men die without answers. i hope a lot. in sports and business once you hope, you have already lost. she will come back and testify. then what? >> kimberly: this is disappointing. why do we put a push on for her to come do the right thing. this f she has a health issue, she has a health issue. concussion, memory loss? i don't know. this you seems suspicious. >> eric: you call this a mess. >> andrea: i don't buy this. i am not sure if she testifies we get answers anyway. clinton are not always the most forthcoming in testimony when they are sworn under oath. i hope the g.o.p. senators can three questions. the first, why wasn't the consulate secured after the two attacks. or why weren't they pulled outer consulate closed? why weren't there answers? i hope she answers them. >> kimberly: who ordered them to stand down? did you talk to president? i want a sometimeline. >> eric: what do you make of this? >> i am kind of with kimberly. i
of her time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. bilirakis: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers. does the gentlelady have further speakers? ms. hochul: i'd like to yield such time to the ranking member of the homeland subcommittee on transportation security, homeland security, the gentlewoman from texas, ms. jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from texas is recognized. ms. jackson lee: i want to thank the gentlelady from new york and i want to say first of all this will not be the last that we hear of your voice. and what a stupendous voice you have. thank you so very much for making this time on the floor a time that pays tribute to veterans, but also recognizes the outstanding service that you've given to this nation, to the committee on homeland security and your other committees, but more importantly, the passion that you've shown as a true american. i hope that we heed the voice that you just lifted up, that we owe to veterans not only this great legislation, but also the ability to come together and work on their behalf and all americans. again, t
of the united states senate, i will present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband. our gift to her because he gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. though gentle in style, he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. when he received his medal of honor, he was rising to the call of the sirens at pearl harbor, volunteering to serve his country, putting aside his own dreams to be a physician. but he went on to be a healer of many wounds. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his fellow soldiers. my experience with senator inouye as a friend was that he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage ever to be elected to the senate. imagine. he himself knew what it was like to break barriers and to break boundaries. when he came to the senate, he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought tirelessly to improve their lives. now his style was one of absolute civility. he was the
and tough lows of this job. so i want to thank her. also, mr. speaker, our two great sons, austin and andrew. they have shared me with thousands of constituents for several years that they have grown into amazing young men, young men that i think will in their own right make a difference as they work their way through their lives. and, mr. speaker, i want to also thank some amazing staff. two it it it names, dozens over many years, four in particular -- too numerous to name, dozenings over the years, some who worked with me the entire years i worked in this congress, jeremy, who has staffed the foreign affairs committee for me, and the oversight subcommittee, also has been my chief of staff in the washington office. jim who has been my district director and long time friend and colleague until st. louis. suzanne arthur, who has been my deputy director. and kathy walz from missouri, former mayor there, but invaluable part of our constituent outreach team. many other staff, but those in particular, thank them for their long and loyal service and the difference they made in so many people's liv
judge and i look forward to her nomination -- confirmation today. and with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? mr. cornyn: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from texas. mr. cornyn: mr. president, can you tell me how much time is remaining on this side? the presiding officer: 15 minutes. mr. cornyn: thank you. mr. president, it's become disturbingly clear that president obama doesn't mind whether or not we drive off the fiscal cliff. just last week, his own treasury secretary, secretary geithner, said the white house was -- quote -- "absolutely" prepared to go off the cliff unless republicans agree to raise marginal tax rates. in other words, during a period of high unemployment -- the highest since the great depression -- the president's willing to risk another recession in order to increase taxes on small businesses and the people we depend upon to create jobs. how much revenue will the president's tax hike generate? well, by raising the top two rates, it would produce only about $68 billion in 2013. i say "only," because in relationship to
was translating this, and the judge looked at me with tears in her eyes and she said, mrs., summers, we all wish for that for our children. >> we are so sorry for you and we hope you one day do get to bring preston home to your home. >> thank you. >> dr. jane aronson is a pediatrician and international adoption specialist. and she joins me now. tough interview, certainly for these families to see what they're going through. i see you're even emotional having watched that just now. what do you make of what's going on here? what do you make of this bill, and what do you think is the motivation behind it? >> i think it's very simple. this is a retaliation, a political maneuver. the russian and american relationships, the relationship between america and russia is in a disaster relationship at this point, but what's really important is first to focus on what we can do to advocate for the families because there are hundreds of families involved, and this is something that has been part of russian adoptions for 25 years. as long as russian adoption has been around, it's been a problem that at any one
on the ground. it doesn't happen right away. >> and she has a bigger difficulty biting her tongue. >> i think i've done pretty well at that. >> but despite her reluctance there are some who say she would make a great lawmaker. congressman jim clyburn believes mrs. obama would be a breath of fresh air in d.c. she's honest and straightforward. "she's exactly what we need around here." and recent polling shows mrs. obama beating senator mark kirk of illinois by double digits in a hypothetical match-up. her husband's adviser david axelrod is warning michelle obama fans not to get their hopes up. >> i don't think michelle has any desire to be a politician. she'll find ways to make contributions, i'm sure. but the last thing i think she would do is run for public office. >> of course there are a number of ways for the first lady to make her mark after her husband finishes his second term. as samuel l. jackson tells "newsweek," michelle is superwoman. "what can't she do?" i agree with that. run, michelle, run. tonight in our survey i asked you, is john boehner's move to reconvene the house a face-savi
the evidence prove? and frankly, her lawyer, mr. bill cherry, is one of the finest attorneys in ft. lauderdale. he has the right to investigate this matter. and while being in the netherlands by itself is an innocuous fact, why aren't they answering these questions? >> that's not true. >> the trail of evidence will lead him to the end result, and if it's innocuous and there really is no mr. aguilar living and alive today, come forward and answer these questions. why can't they tell us what's going on? maybe there's more to the story, and that's why they're not coming forward. but the bottom line is this needs to be investigated, and jamie, as a surviving wife, has the right to know what the truth is concerning her husband. harris: tad? >> well, the bottom line here is if they're hiding money, it's easy to follow a paper trail of money. and this situation is no different than any other paper trail. also how hard would it be to get an investigator in the netherlands to look around, follow the money trail and see if they see anything that doesn't look proper? the bottom line is the only thing tha
, and it will be, it will be a testament to her work and her love for her daughter. mr. speaker, i urge the house to pass katie's law and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i yield four minutes to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. pearce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new mexico is recognized for four minutes. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding and i thank the gentleman from california, mr. schiff, for his leadership on this. i rise in strong support of h.r. 6014 today. katie sepich, her picture her here, tells us a lot. she was fun-loving, vibrant, outgoing. she was a leader in our age group. she made things happen. katie, beginning in january of 2002, was in her last year of grad school. during that year, in one of the last conversations with her daughter, her mom asked her daughter the same question that many of us receive from our parents. what are you going to do? when you graduate with your master's degree in business? the reply was the
back up, which is exactly what nancy pelosi proposed. we will take her proposal. and mr. van hollen says it will not give one a democratic road or something -- for something your leader proposed three months ago. that as political theater, mr. van hollen. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i wish the outgoing chairman of financial services well. this policy did not make the tax proposal that would -- nancy pelosi did not have a tax proposal that would give people earning over $1 million in tax break. no. 2, the proposal the president has put on the table has trillions of dollars of cuts, which is more than in the cuts on the table and would deal with the sequestered. the republican proposal will increase the likelihood taxpayers have to pay -- bailout the financial industry again. they strip away the independence of the consumer finance protection board so that lobbyists can meddle in exactly how they do their work so that they are looking out for the interests of lobbyists rather than the interests of the american people. this approach we're seeing here is another example of trying to help
the house budget. passed not once but twice. provided real solutions. mr. speaker, here's our spending represented a different way, because there's so many head herrings in this body. i -- red herrings in this body. i want to say, mr. speaker, if you help me spread the word with my colleagues on the left. i'm on the rules committee. we often handle the rules debate here on the floor. it gets toxic from time to time. folks are trying to make their point. everybody's got their talking points. it turns out into an -- turns into an argument instead of a discussion how o to make america better. i do hope in this coming time, whether we use special order to do it, time off the floor to do it, we'll find an opportunity to have more of a discussion. because the facts are what the facts are. we ought to be able to agree on what the facts are, and then we ought to be able to disagree what about the solutions are. we ought to be able to question each other's judgment without questioning each other's motivations. i hope we'll be able to spend some time on that. i heard folks say, mr. speaker, oh,
're so fine you blow my mind hey mickey, hey mickey >>> mr. strahan? yes, yes. no, it wasn't me. >> get it fixed! >> i'm going to pass on her cell number. thank you, michael. love you, bro. >> i will take you. i will go with you. >> cheerleading is about more than just wearing a really short skirt and a big smile. you also have to be a good speller. >> actually rob, you might be surprised. >> really? >> cheerleaders these days are pretty amazing athletes and fierce competitors. abc's juju chang has more. >> reporter: it takes flipping out to a whole new level. >> oh! >> if you fall again, i'm going to replace you. >> reporter: tlc's new show, "cheer perfection," brings us inside the rough and tumble world of competitive cheerleading. >> that's the worst basket toss i've ever seen in my life. that was terrible, absolutely terrible. >> reporter: alicia dunlap is head coach and co-owner of cheer time revolution in arkansas. it's her job to make little girls into little champions, no matter what it takes. >> come down. everybody run because of cameron and cassidy. >> reporter: even her own
scoring partisan political points. it is her character that has made the difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character. i want to share my colleagues this morning a story about olympia snowe that i witnessed personally. there was a republican fund- raiser going on one night and i was arriving late driving in a car. people weren't streaming out of the fund-raiser and each of them was passing by a man who was on crutches with only one leg, clearly destitute, clearly down on his luck, but the was asking for money. everybody but olympia snowe passing by without a word as if he were invisible. olympia went over to this destitute man on crutches with one leg and she not only handed him some money, but she took the time to talk to him. i think that tells you so much about who olympia snowe is. her kindness to this individual when everyone else was passing by. the kindness when no one was watching. her kindness to him was a private act that told all lost -- al of us so much about our character. it with her retirement from the senate,
and say i enjoyed our working relationship over the last six years and note that will continue as well. mr. conyers: thank you very much. i now turn to the gentlelady from texas, a senior member of judiciary, ms. sheila jackson lee. i will yield her as much time as she may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from texas is recognized for as much time as she may consume. ms. jackson lee: i thank the gentleman verp. this is an enormously positive exhibition of the working relationship of the members of the house judiciary committee. and i thank both the chairman and ranking member for the evidence of collegiality of the waning moments of the 112th congress. i want to follow my ranking member and acknowledge appreciation for the service of judiciary committee chairperson lamar smith who happens to be a tall texan and so we are delighted to thank him very much for the work that he's done. and to join with and established icon of judiciary prominence in john conyers, the two matched well in their excellence. and i thank the ranking member and the former chairperson for his work and
. it probably was exactly the wrong time pause of his weakened condition. >> mr. bush is the country's oldest living president. his doctors are cautiously optimistic. >> david lee miller, thank you. >>> the head of the environmental protection agency, lisa jackson, is leaving her post. in a statement, she said she will leave the epa confident the ship is sailing the right direction. the president released a statement praising lisa jackson for taking steps to protect our air and water, helping to combat climate change and passing new fuel economy standards. republican lawmakers and industrial groups often accused her and the epa of killing jobs, making it harder for american companies to compete on the world stage. >>> every year thousands of american families save russian children from horrific conditions but that could stop. critics say it's all because russia's president is making a political ploy. we speak with a family about their efforts to adopt a russian child and what the move means to them. pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webca
in a book called the "friendly fire" about the death of her son a young army private. general schwartzkopf was the army commander and he was so human and approachable to mrs. mullen. it was impressive. clearly he was an impressive guy. tell us your thoughts and memories of general sworts co h schwartzkopf. >> he was an impressive guy. i he met him when i whe was a mr and i was a lieutenant. i had an unpleasant experience with him during which i was trying to exercise my authority and responsibility. he is a higher ranking guy telling me, no, i he wasn't going to do it. i lost. it was a fair fight, even though he's three times my size. he's a really tough guy. one of the interesting things about him that is unfortunately not practiced frequently in the military or anywhere else, by the way, is that he always led from the front sometimes recklessly, and the mistakes that we all make in combat from time to time and we've all made our share, him included, is that we have a tendency to miscalculate. we go left instead of right. we wait too long and don't wait long enough for ninformation. he m
. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. every debate is not the question. the question is a good piece of paper decided to marriage. a question of and equality. i have this friend and her parents got together about 20 years now. one of them is great at cooking and awful at directions. the couple followed by cnn ryan aren't allowed to get married. the official definition is formal union of a man and a woman, physically recognized by law which they become husband-and-wife. but. but why today's society, and accepting society sisto richart between men and women? people have partnerships and are not allowed to be asserted as has been our wife and although marriage isn't for everyone, shouldn't it be something everyone can decide to? how could she feel if you couldn't bear the person you love? the first is not driven in 2001 in the last, argentina 2010. 10 countries in 11 years isn't that exciting. love is the natural human emotion. why should the of the person you love change anything? why should we let authority to take her society can and can't get married? we as a society have a moral an
is -- socially adept and politically savvy. dolley madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe hated it. >> she wants her husband, you cannot rule without including what women want and women have to contribute. >> during this statement, you were a little breathless and there was too much looking down. i think it was a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> probably the most tragic of all forced ladies -- first ladies. >> she later wrote it in her memoir that she never made any decision, i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. you stop and think about how much power that is. it is a lot of power. >> prior to this battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for people to survive and to flourish as a result. i do not know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i am constantly reminded about all the people who have lived there before, and particul
,", which, you know, was profittedly based on anna wintour. your thoughts on that, mr. ambassador. >> how do you know she's not going to be the next secretary of state? why limit her to a mere ambassadorship? it wouldn't surprise me. it has been historically the case that large contributors to presidential campaigns get appointed -- megyn: and she's one of the top ten bundlers for president obama. >> and i have to tell you, i've had wide experience with political appointees -- true, mostly republicans -- and they've been very effective. i would not underestimate how important it is overseas to have somebody who knows the president personally, who could call the president if they needed to. and here's the really important thing, who cares first and foremost about the president's policy. not about what the bureaucracy at the state department wants, but about the president's policy. i'm not saying anna wintour's going to do all that -- megyn: right. >> but that is important. megyn: what does that person do? if you become the boord to the u.k., what do you do? >> well, that is one of the hardest
tennessee. mr. alexander: i speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. alexander: i want to thank the senator from california for her comments on the senate rules. i agree, this is something we should be able to talk among ourselves and work out. some of us who have been here a little while, watch the senate, know that it is a unique institution and fundamentally most of us are not very happy with the idea -- i think on bodge sidebothsides of the aisle not functioning as effectively as we really should. we need to get bills to the floor and then we need to have amendments. it's been historically the responsibility of the majority to decide what comes to the floor. and historically the minority, whom that happens twhomever thas the opportunity to have amendments. a couple of things have happened. the minority has blocked bills coming to the floor. that didn't happen. it happened 25 years ago. something else happened over the last 25 years. a procedure called filling the tree was invented by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dol
. and obviously she is not taking questions about it under oath up on capitol hill today. >> we heard her spokeswoman yesterday basically say, look you're going to hear from mr. nyds and from nicolas burns this morning and they are speaking on behalf of hillary clinton. should that be satisfactory? we understand that hillary clinton is going to testify in january. how different is the climate going to be in january in the middle of the inauguration and everything else, bret? >> right, i think there are senators up there who are concerned about that. they are senator kerry is saying that secretary clinton will testify in january. of course she won't be the secretary of state. and it may very well be senator kerry who is on his way to being secretary of state. we don't know that as of yet. but, remember, there will be a lot of turn over, there will be probably the inauguration underway, there will be nominations and a lot of things happening here that people may get a lot of different focus than benghazi. but, listen, we'll continue to cover it here. there are some information things that t
involved in the manufacturing of water heaters. i thank the chairman again. i thank mr. aderholt and i also want to commend the gentleman and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from california continues to reserve. the gentlelady from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: mr. speaker, at this time i would like to recognize for a period of three minutes dr. roe of tennessee who's a member of the education committee, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for three minutes. mr. roe: i thank the gentleman, the chairman, for yielding, and, mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 6582. this legislation would establish a uniform energy efficient descripter for all water heaters, walk-in freezers and walk-in coolers. the legislation also improves the testing methods that determine whether or not these products are energy efficient which will provide certainty for manufacturers and their products. in my hometown is o
additional time to address this, and i'm happy to yield to him. mr. merkley: thank you, senator wyden. you mentioned anoringian sitting in coos bay, working on his or her lap stop, and calling up and saying the government can collect tangible material related to an investigation. does that mean that they can collect all of my web conversations knowing that the web circuits travel around the world multiple times, sometimes they pass through a foreign space. they ask this question because they are concerned about the fourth amendment and their privacy. how much ability do you have to give them a definitive answer on that? mr. wyden: absent the information that we are seeking to get under the amendment that i am going to offer, i don't think that it's possible for a senator to respond to your question. the issue for i think an individual senator would be do you know whether anyone has ever estimated how many u.s. phone calls and emails have been warrantlessly collected under the statute? do you know whether any wholly domestic calls and emails have been collected under this statute, which i b
with a more than $3 million positive balance. this progressive steps she took. i listened to her and i believe that's the kind of leadership that can help us continue down this path. >> senator hagan. >> thank you, mr. chairman. mr. secretary, thank you for your testimony today. i know that senator corker asked about reverse mortgages and i am concerned about that issue and i'm particularly concerned that $2.8 billion of the 16 billion economic shortfall are related to the program. can you talk more about why these classes on the reverse mortgage program? >> here's the fundamental problem without getting into too much of the history. at one point when fannie mae was issuing these phones, they were generally variable rate they allowed a borrower to basically draw on it over time the amount of money they need. as that program has switched to being a chimney may program, there is basically no option for those borrowers to do anything to try the full amount. >> why? >> because we don't have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes that would allow us to limit the draw up front. that
. >> and so, mr. cali, -- mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to vote no. certainly on the underlying bill, and i yield back the balance of my time. >> the lady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman is recognized. >> let me just say that we all know we are 11 days away from going over the poor real fiscal cliff. we are doing our dog blondest -- doggonedest. i think the discussions taking place are very important. i also think it is important for every member of the house to be able to have an opportunity to state where they stand on these issues. the bill before us is actual one which has, again, basically enjoyed bipartisan support. i remember when senator schumer made it clear that he believed that there should not be any increase or anyone who earns under $1 million. that was a request that he said. i know there was a lot of discussion in the caucus about what that level should be. this is at the level of senator schumer indicated that he supported earlier on. i have got to say to my friend from rochester, mr. speaker. we are not planning to adjourn. we want to address this
it makes no sense. >> reporter: sense something garcia's wife of 59 years thinks her husband could use. do you think he's crazy? >> loco? >> reporter: call him crazy, but there is an entire federal office, the bureau of public debt, that collects money from hundreds of mr. garcias. this office in parkersburg, west virginia, was set up by president kennedy, so citizens could pay down the national debt. this year alone, it's collected $7.7 million in gifts, about $90 million since it was established. but $90 million isn't that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says, you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since -- >> 1992. >> reporter: that's when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the death. the depression era kid and army veteran says he's giving back to a country that's given him so much. a sense that's infectious. his daughter is now collecting cabs at work. his g
than $3 billion positive balance. those were aggressive steps that she took. i listened to her but she took those. and i believe that that's the kind of leadership that can help us continue down this path. >> thank you. senator hagen. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and, mr. secretary, thanks for your testimony today. i know that senator corker asked about reverse mortgages. and i am concerned about that issue and i'm particularly concerned that $2.8 billion of the $16 billion economic shortfall are related to that program. can you talk a little bit more about why these losses under the reverse mortgage program are so is he rear? >> here's the fundamental problem. without getting into too much of the history. at one point when fannie mae was issuing these loans, they were generally variable rate and they could -- they allowed a borrower to basically draw on a, you know, over time, the amount of money that they needed. as that program has switched to being a ginny may program, there is basically no option for those borrowers to do anything but draw the full amount. >> and why? >> because we
to her, and i believe that is the kind of leadership to help us continue down this path. >> thank you. senator? >> thank you. thank you for your testimony today mr. secretary. i know the senator asked about reverse mortgages. i am concerned about that issue. i am particularly concerned that $2.80 billion of the $16 billion economic shortfall are related. can you talk a little more about why these losses are so severe? >> here is the fundamental problem, without getting into yoo-hoo t -- into too much detail. the loans were generally variable rate and allowed the bar were -- borrower. there is basically no option for them to do anything but draw the full amount. >> why? >> we do not have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes to the program to allow us to limit the draw up front. that is the change we are asking to be made. our alternative, and i was just discussing this, we could basically eliminate or put a moratorium on our regular program, which is somewhat safer. the problem is we do not have that authority under that program to avoid the full-draw feature of it. t
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)